How To Handle These Holiday Stress Items

December 7, 2018

ID 61803599 © Sebastiangauert | Dreamstime.com

While the holidays are anticipated by all, it can also be the source of a lot of stress! The American Psychological Association warns that everyday issues like working, fighting traffic and paying bills are exacerbated by the added expenses, travel congestion and family drama that the holidays drum up. The biggest ite4ms of stress this time of year are the calendar, finances, overeating and family. Women are more likely than men to report increased stress during the holidays; they have a harder time relaxing; and they’re more likely to manage stress with unhealthy habits like comfort eating. So experts in personal finance, nutrition and mental health shared some coping strategies to make the season a little merrier. When it comes to your calendar, don't put too much pressure on yourself to make everyone happy. Only hit one holiday event during the week, and one on the weekends. Or even just stop by for an hour if it’s an obligation that you just can’t miss, explaining that you need to get up early for work or to get the kids to school the next morning. Take care of yourself first. When it comes to finances, stick to your budget (it's not too late to make one for Christmas). If you simply can’t afford to buy for everyone on your list, reach out to friends and family to suggest a Secret Santa exchange instead. Or talk to family members and say, "Let’s just give gifts to the kids this year.” A lot of times, people will be relieved to go ahead and do that, because shopping for gifts is stressful for everybody. It can easy to stuff your face when stressed, especially with all the sugary holiday treats. So only indulge in those holiday favorites that are meaningful. If someone brings holiday doughnuts to the office, don’t just eat them because they’re there. Instead, eat your normal, healthy breakfast, and save the indulgence for something that you really enjoy this time of year, like your friend’s homemade eggnog, or your grandmother’s chocolate pecan pie. Finally, the family. Feuding relatives are never fun. If there’s one relative in particular whose making you uncomfortable and express how their action make you feel. Or at the least, set boundaries for yourself. For example, if one of your parents tries drawing you into a political debate, say in a calm manner, “This isn’t something I want to talk about. Let’s talk about something else.” Or if they keep pushing the matter, politely excuse yourself and leave the room.

SOURCE: Moneyish

See and hear more from the 98.5 KTK Morning Show 

98.5 KTK Morning Show Podcast